Here’s the Scoop on Some of the Best Low Calorie Ice Creams

With so many brands, and even more flavor choices, it can be a cold and difficult task choosing the tastiest low calorie ice creams. We brought together a panel of taste testers to try some of the best low-calorie ice creams on the market today. You’ll find out the good and the bad so you can spend less time in the frozen food section wondering which ones are worth spending your money on!

Arctic Zero: Even if you weren’t a fan of Arctic Zero’s original lactose-free ice cream alternative,you need to give their new light ice creams a shot. Made from real milk, cream, and cane sugar, these pints contain no sugar alcohols, are non-GMO, and have a boost of prebiotic fiber.
Pros: Testers found the cookie shake flavor to be perfectly sweetened, with just the right amount of chocolate flavor.
Cons: Some testers thought the taste was chalky like a protein shake and not quite creamy enough. One tester thought the flavor was too “airy” or light.

Breyers Delights: This legendary ice cream brand prides itself on offering something for every type of ice cream eater, including people looking for a healthy treat. Breyers new Delights line of light ice cream offers 260 to 330 calories and 20 grams of protein per pint, thanks to added milk protein and stevia.
Pros: Testers said it had lots of flavor with the tart, fruity raspberry and plenty of fudge swirls throughout.
Cons: One tester said the flavor would be even better with which chocolate mixed in! Another thought it tasted too much like sherbert.

Ben and Jerry’s Moo-Phoria: If you love ice cream loaded with mix-ins, Ben & Jerry’s is most likely your favorite brand. You’ll be happy to learn they preserved that unique part of their ice cream in their Moo-Phoria light ice cream flavors. The result is a treat with 60 to 70 percent less fat and 35 percent fewer calories than traditional Ben & Jerry’s ice creams, but all the hidden-treasure goodness of Phish Food and Half Baked.
Pros: Most testers ranked this as their favorite healthy ice cream for its creaminess, rich flavor and the perfect amount of mix-ins.
Cons: Testers noted that this ice cream is the quickest to melt.

Enlightened: Enlightened crowns itself the best-of-the-best in healthy ice cream, logging even fewer calories, fewer grams of sugar and fat, and more protein and fiber than other healthy ice cream brands. They offer a wide variety of inventive flavors, logging in at just 60 to 100 calories per half-cup serving. Sweetened with zero-calorie erythritol and packed with fiber from corn, Enlightened promises not to spike blood sugar.
Pros: Testers loved the chocolate and graham cracker mix-ins. They said the flavor was just right and it the texture was perfectly creamy.
Cons: Testers didn’t note any cons for the S’mores flavor!

Halo Top: If you’ve been on Instagram anytime in the last year, you’ve likely seen Halo Top on your feed. This social-sensation brand uses organic stevia and erythritol to create sweet, creamy desserts that clock in at only 280 to 360 calories per pint. Their dairy-free flavors allow vegans and lactose-intolerant ice cream fans to get in on the hype too.
Pros: The sweetness and added sprinkles were the top pros for this pick.
Cons: Some testers thought the flavor was too rich, while others noted the texture to be “icy” and not creamy enough.

Continuing Education and Why it is So Important

Many people graduate from college and jump into their career thinking that school is now in their past and they won’t ever need to write an essay or study again. However, it’s a proven fact that continuing education is the best way to keep your mind strong and can even be a confidence booster. Studies have shown that continuing to learn can help with everyday skills and improve the way your brain performs on a day-to-day basis.

Now, continuing education doesn’t have to mean going back to school or adding more to your student debt. It can be something as simple as taking a one-night class at your local community college or taking up a hobby like learning a new language. Anything that gets you excited and helps to keep your mind functioning at its highest level can be beneficial.

Another way to continue learning is to attend conferences or networking events to further your knowledge and connections. Being in the know of everything your industry offers, as well as being connected, is a sure way to have an edge over competitors in your field. You can also take courses on topics like HTML/CSS or the basics in design programs like Photoshop and Illustrator. In today’s world, the more tech knowledge you have, the better.

And for those of you who cringe at the thought of speaking in front of a group of people, there are classes to help with that as well. These classes help to enhance your professional skills like public speaking, negotiation tactics and ways to effectively market your company. Activities may include things like role playing and speaking in front of the class to help you gain experience and confidence that prepare you for the real thing.

Finally, in today’s world of everything being online, you can learn a new skill or hobby just by watching video tutorials. You can find instructional videos and how-tos for almost anything. Have you been wanting to take a photography class? Want to brush up on your cooking skills or try a new recipe? Just type it into the search bar and ta-da, hundreds of videos to choose from!

All that being said, get out there! Take the first step and research non-credit classes at your local community college or jump into that hobby you’ve always wanted to try. In your down time, you can also do brain exercises like the ones listed below to keep your cognitive levels on point. Remember, keep your mind active and never stop learning!

https://www.themuse.com/advice/schools-not-out-the-importance-of-continuing-education

Work Out Your Brain

Everyone knows the importance of eating healthy and getting some sort of exercise on a regular basis, but many people forget the importance of also exercising their brain. Studies have shown that doing regular “brain exercises,” along with regular exercise and eating plenty of antioxidants, can increase your brain’s cognitive reserve. There are several types of software that can be purchased to put your brain to work, but experts recommend practicing more real-world activities for more effective brain training. Here are 10 effective and less expensive ways to give your mind a workout.


1. Test your recall: Do something as simple as making a grocery list and try to memorize everything on it. Put it away for an hour or so and then see how many items you can recall.

2. Music: Studies have shown that learning to play a musical instrument over time or singing in a choir can do wonders for an aging mind.

3. Mental Math: With all the technology available today, math is made simple, but figuring out problems the old-fashioned way can be a great mental stimulation. To really test your cognitive abilities, try walking at the same time!

4. Cooking Class: Whether you’re a natural in the kitchen or are more of a microwave chef, try cooking something new. Because cooking involves so many senses (smell, touch, sight and taste) it is ideal for working several different parts of the brain.

5. Learn a new language: Not only does the listening stimulate the brain, but having a rich vocabulary has been linked to reducing the risk of cognitive decline.

6. Visualizing Words: Think about a word and the way it is spelled in your mind and then use either the first two or last two letters to form another word. This activity helps to refresh your brain on the things you already know.

7. Maps: After traveling to a new place, sit down and try to visualize a map that you used and draw it from memory.

8. How good are your tastebuds: When eating a meal, try and identify the different ingredients that you are tasting, like the different spices or other tastes that may be harder to place.

9. Hand-eye coordination: Instead of watching television or using various forms of technology, try a hobby that requires the use of your fine-motor skills like knitting, drawing/coloring or doing a puzzle.

10. Learn a sport: Try a new sport that not only uses the body, but also the mind, for instance yoga, golf or tennis.